The heavy reverb effect you hear on a lot of Travis Scott records has gone viral.

You now hear it all the time, and it is such a cool effect to use.

It can help fill in space on records that need more energy.

I tend to use the Valhalla Vintage Reverb for this effect. Check out the video below to see how!

 

TRANSCRIPT

Hey, what’s up, guys? It’s Matty here at MixandMasterMySong.com. Today, I’m gonna show you how to get that kind of Travis Scott, long tail reverb sound. I use it on ad libs a lot, I use it as an effect, sometimes instead of using a delay it just can kind of extend the ad libs for a rap song or really any song and make it sound a bit more dreamy and bring some excitement and stuff to a song.

So first what I’ll do is I’ll go over how to get the effect, what plug-in I use for that effect, and then kind of how I use it in a mix. So check it, we go this song by Cam Meaken, it’s called Big Joints. Check it out on Spotify. And what I use is the ValhallaVintageVerb. And we’ll go to default so I can just … we’ll start a new one so I can show you guys how to get to where I get. So here’s the Valhalla.

So I always start off this setting, it’s called Huge Spaces and it’s called Medieval and what we’ll do is I’ll play the ad lib track with it. So you can hear it goes off forever. It’s got like a 10 second decay time. So first off I’m going to bring this mix down obviously, usually around 22 depending on what I’m going for. And then I pull this attack back which will kind of make the reverb hit a little later, so you can get the word through before the tail comes. And then the decay I tend to bring down to four to five, depending once again on the song tempo and what I’m going for.

So now should be able to hear it. We’ll hear the mix. So right off the bat you can see how it kind of brings some more energy to the song. But I find using it like on awe, especially an ad lib track like this where you got multiple words together, it can tend to be a little bit too much and it starts getting your mix kind of washy. So what I’ll usually do is just duplicate the track and then I’ll drag over a few of the punchlines. So the “yeah” and then the “one-two-three.” And then “four”, put that one there. So you can tail out a few of the choice words and that kind of … One, doesn’t make the reverb so washy and going all the time and, two, makes the effect cool. Because I find if you just have it on every word, it gets boring and it’s not like a change in the song, or something happening that’s different in the song.

So, by putting it on it’s own track and picking three to four lines that might work, for me, it sounds better. And then what I’ll do sometimes is just turn those up a little bit. So now hear it. And it’s cool. Right there is really cool. And then you can mess with it. Turn up the mix more. I was wondering … Yeah. There we go. We gotta turn off the main one. Felt like it was always happening. Here we go now.

That’s more like it. So now you can hear the difference between the two, and so it can go back to the old ad lib, just dryish ad lib with this little bit of verb on it. What do I got on here? Some echo boy. Let’s go into my excitor and the delays that are happening once in a while, and then I have a little reverb probably from the CLA that I use on ad libs. So, let’s hear it one more time.

And then hear that “one, two, three, hey.” Without that, it’s a whole different thing there. See, not so much energy. So it’s really cool. You can throw it on a couple things here and there and it can really help bring life to your song. So let me know what you think. If you’ve got any questions, please leave in the comments below. If you need your songs mixed or mastered, hit me up at MixandMasterMySong.com. We also offer … I’m starting to offer lessons through Skype on there, so if that’s something you’re interested in, we can do that as well. So, thanks a lot. Talk to you soon.

Share This